lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

laserfilth:

blakelywintersfield:

gareth-mcgrillens-legs:

mintcarousel:

-starlightdrive-:

anthro-octavia:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts? Why not follow Ultrafacts

*wants to ride a wooly mammoth to Wawa* B)

Michael Crichton taught me that this is a very bad idea

Nah man that was only Dinosaurs. We’re cool with other prehistoric animals, like the Andrewsarchus

the Enteledont

the first sabre toothed animal, Gorgonopsid

and my personal favourite, the 60- foot long predatory whale, Basilosaurus.

… Yeah I don’t think this is a good idea either…

on the plus side we can have dodo birds back

No but you guys don’t understand
there’s species that are becoming extinct every day
there’s species that are so critically endangered that no one has hope for them
there’s hundreds of species that are doomed to disappear
this could bring them all back and undo all the damage done when we didn’t know better about these animals
we could save tigers and pandas and bring back the Tasmanian wolf

And we could bring back black rhinos, pyrenean ibex, bluebucks, dire wolves, etc, and maybe even thylacines (if we ever find a suitable surrogate mother-species or can potentially build an artificial womb for it). But mate, you don’t want to bring back the entelodont… that’s an enteloton’t

We’re totally cool with Andrewsarchus, Entelodon, Inostrancevia and Basilosaurus.
But enough about synapsids and kin.


I would love to see some of these animals resurrected. But there is a reason that there is a focus on passenger pigeons and mammoths. 
There has only been one animal that has become de-extinct, and then only for a few minutes. That is the Pyrenean Ibex, and the vast majority of fertilized eggs in the 2 different experiments designed to bring it back never made it to birth. Only one did. However, part of her lung had formed as a liver, and she died shortly after birth. There was nothing anyone could do.
The reason they chose these animals is because we have a significant amount of soft tissue from them. Passenger pigeons have been preserved and we can access their DNA by combining the fragments we find in their specimens.
As for mammoths, we have found literally tons and tons of mammoth ivory, bone, hair, and flesh. There are places where the locals will cook and eat mammoth meat, and even give it to their dogs because it is so plentiful. There is an entire small community in Siberia whose primary resource is mammoth ivory, which they sell to Hong Kong to be carved. 
If we resurrect anything, we need the animal’s DNA (fossilized specimens are out) so we have to look that animals that have been naturally or artificially preserved. Animals for which we only have imprints on rocks are really really out. Furthermore, a clone needs a suitable womb. The Pyrenean Ibex was hosted by a hybrid of a Spanish Ibex and a goat. A mammoth would be hosted by an African Elephant. Thylacines are out. Plesiosaurs are double out.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

laserfilth:

blakelywintersfield:

gareth-mcgrillens-legs:

mintcarousel:

-starlightdrive-:

anthro-octavia:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts? Why not follow Ultrafacts

*wants to ride a wooly mammoth to Wawa* B)

Michael Crichton taught me that this is a very bad idea

Nah man that was only Dinosaurs. We’re cool with other prehistoric animals, like the Andrewsarchus

image

the Enteledont

image

the first sabre toothed animal, Gorgonopsid

image

and my personal favourite, the 60- foot long predatory whale, Basilosaurus.

image

… Yeah I don’t think this is a good idea either…

on the plus side we can have dodo birds back

No but you guys don’t understand

there’s species that are becoming extinct every day

there’s species that are so critically endangered that no one has hope for them

there’s hundreds of species that are doomed to disappear

this could bring them all back and undo all the damage done when we didn’t know better about these animals

we could save tigers and pandas and bring back the Tasmanian wolf

And we could bring back black rhinos, pyrenean ibex, bluebucks, dire wolves, etc, and maybe even thylacines (if we ever find a suitable surrogate mother-species or can potentially build an artificial womb for it). But mate, you don’t want to bring back the entelodont… that’s an enteloton’t

We’re totally cool with Andrewsarchus, Entelodon, Inostrancevia and Basilosaurus.

But enough about synapsids and kin.

I would love to see some of these animals resurrected. But there is a reason that there is a focus on passenger pigeons and mammoths. 

There has only been one animal that has become de-extinct, and then only for a few minutes. That is the Pyrenean Ibex, and the vast majority of fertilized eggs in the 2 different experiments designed to bring it back never made it to birth. Only one did. However, part of her lung had formed as a liver, and she died shortly after birth. There was nothing anyone could do.

The reason they chose these animals is because we have a significant amount of soft tissue from them. Passenger pigeons have been preserved and we can access their DNA by combining the fragments we find in their specimens.

As for mammoths, we have found literally tons and tons of mammoth ivory, bone, hair, and flesh. There are places where the locals will cook and eat mammoth meat, and even give it to their dogs because it is so plentiful. There is an entire small community in Siberia whose primary resource is mammoth ivory, which they sell to Hong Kong to be carved. 

If we resurrect anything, we need the animal’s DNA (fossilized specimens are out) so we have to look that animals that have been naturally or artificially preserved. Animals for which we only have imprints on rocks are really really out. Furthermore, a clone needs a suitable womb. The Pyrenean Ibex was hosted by a hybrid of a Spanish Ibex and a goat. A mammoth would be hosted by an African Elephant. Thylacines are out. Plesiosaurs are double out.

Websites to publish a free chapter on?

Hi all,

I’ve written some of the Strange Biology book, and I’m going to publish a chapter online for y’all to read for free.

I was hoping that I could send it to a more mainstream website (non-tumblr) as a promo for the book. I submitted it to one place but if they don’t accept it, do you know of any website that would? Anything to do with biology, medicine, animals, or the weird that is big enough to be popular but open enough to accept unpaid submissions. Also, it’s a little surgically graphic so maybe a darker place.

Of course I could just post it here, but then I’d kind of be preaching to the choir. Either way I promise to release the chapter for free.

Thanks for your help!

strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays
Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.
For All Your Yesterdays, paleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.
Art Credits:
Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.
H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx
Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths
Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus
Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.
Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)
Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves
Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers. 
These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!
Zoom Info

strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays

Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.

For All Your Yesterdayspaleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.

Art Credits:

Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.

H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx

Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths

Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus

Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.

Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)

Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves

Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers

These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

This is especially exciting because as we can see, one artist speculated that Spinosaurus could have been aquatic. And we just learned that, yes, that was the case!

strangebiology:

Gertie the Dinosaur was released in 1914 by Windsor McCay. It was the first film to use some animation techniques such as keyframes and tracing paper, and was the first film to feature a dinosaur.
100 years later and we have come a long way in animation technology as well as scientific knowledge of dinosaurs. Hollywood has featured dinosaurs in popular science fiction movies, and BBC has published many documentary-style films about prehistoric life. In December 2013, BBC released a reboot of their popular Walking with Dinosaurs documentary with a new 3D film.
Happy centennial, Gertie!

GERTIE THE DINOSAUR IS EXACTLY 100 YEARS OLD TODAY!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Gertie the Dinosaur was released in 1914 by Windsor McCay. It was the first film to use some animation techniques such as keyframes and tracing paper, and was the first film to feature a dinosaur.
100 years later and we have come a long way in animation technology as well as scientific knowledge of dinosaurs. Hollywood has featured dinosaurs in popular science fiction movies, and BBC has published many documentary-style films about prehistoric life. In December 2013, BBC released a reboot of their popular Walking with Dinosaurs documentary with a new 3D film.
Happy centennial, Gertie!

GERTIE THE DINOSAUR IS EXACTLY 100 YEARS OLD TODAY!
Zoom Info
strangebiology:

Gertie the Dinosaur was released in 1914 by Windsor McCay. It was the first film to use some animation techniques such as keyframes and tracing paper, and was the first film to feature a dinosaur.
100 years later and we have come a long way in animation technology as well as scientific knowledge of dinosaurs. Hollywood has featured dinosaurs in popular science fiction movies, and BBC has published many documentary-style films about prehistoric life. In December 2013, BBC released a reboot of their popular Walking with Dinosaurs documentary with a new 3D film.
Happy centennial, Gertie!

GERTIE THE DINOSAUR IS EXACTLY 100 YEARS OLD TODAY!
Zoom Info

strangebiology:

Gertie the Dinosaur was released in 1914 by Windsor McCay. It was the first film to use some animation techniques such as keyframes and tracing paper, and was the first film to feature a dinosaur.

100 years later and we have come a long way in animation technology as well as scientific knowledge of dinosaurs. Hollywood has featured dinosaurs in popular science fiction movies, and BBC has published many documentary-style films about prehistoric life. In December 2013, BBC released a reboot of their popular Walking with Dinosaurs documentary with a new 3D film.

Happy centennial, Gertie!

GERTIE THE DINOSAUR IS EXACTLY 100 YEARS OLD TODAY!

These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info
These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.
Zoom Info

These are some specimens around the ucberkeley life sciences building. Their Museum of Vertebrate Zoology isn’t really the kind of museum you can visit, but you can see some great stuff in the halls right outside it.

I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info
I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.
Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.
If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 
Zoom Info

I love University museums. They are top quality but so, so affordable.

Here are some paleontological specimens from utaustin's Texas Memorial Museum. I gotta say, when I saw that Quetzalcoatlus (the flying reptile pictured up top), big as a fighter jet suspended from the ceiling, it took my breath away.

If you’re ever in Austin, check out that place as well as the other museums on campus. 

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

uchicagoadmissions:

Dinosaurs, yeah!
Paul Sereno, UChicago’s devilishly handsome bad-boy of paleontology, shows how the bones of the Spinosaurus reveal it as one of the first semi-aquatic dinosaur, as well as the troubled saga of locating the bones in the first place, and the cultural impact of returning the fossils to their origin in Morocco.
Check it out!

GIF ANIMATION

YES A GIF OF SPINOSAURUS WALKING
See it is so weird
Zoom Info
lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

uchicagoadmissions:

Dinosaurs, yeah!
Paul Sereno, UChicago’s devilishly handsome bad-boy of paleontology, shows how the bones of the Spinosaurus reveal it as one of the first semi-aquatic dinosaur, as well as the troubled saga of locating the bones in the first place, and the cultural impact of returning the fossils to their origin in Morocco.
Check it out!

GIF ANIMATION

YES A GIF OF SPINOSAURUS WALKING
See it is so weird
Zoom Info
lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

uchicagoadmissions:

Dinosaurs, yeah!
Paul Sereno, UChicago’s devilishly handsome bad-boy of paleontology, shows how the bones of the Spinosaurus reveal it as one of the first semi-aquatic dinosaur, as well as the troubled saga of locating the bones in the first place, and the cultural impact of returning the fossils to their origin in Morocco.
Check it out!

GIF ANIMATION

YES A GIF OF SPINOSAURUS WALKING
See it is so weird
Zoom Info
lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

uchicagoadmissions:

Dinosaurs, yeah!
Paul Sereno, UChicago’s devilishly handsome bad-boy of paleontology, shows how the bones of the Spinosaurus reveal it as one of the first semi-aquatic dinosaur, as well as the troubled saga of locating the bones in the first place, and the cultural impact of returning the fossils to their origin in Morocco.
Check it out!

GIF ANIMATION

YES A GIF OF SPINOSAURUS WALKING
See it is so weird
Zoom Info

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

uchicagoadmissions:

Dinosaurs, yeah!

Paul Sereno, UChicago’s devilishly handsome bad-boy of paleontology, shows how the bones of the Spinosaurus reveal it as one of the first semi-aquatic dinosaur, as well as the troubled saga of locating the bones in the first place, and the cultural impact of returning the fossils to their origin in Morocco.

Check it out!

GIF ANIMATION

YES A GIF OF SPINOSAURUS WALKING

See it is so weird