Bizarre, exciting and sometimes disturbing ephemera from the world of biology. Read for medical history and breakthroughs, mutations, cryptic animals, weird bodies and more.
Reblogged from sickroomcookery  1,129 notes

zooophagous:

billibones:

cavalaxis:

Jim Phillips, 59, has been hunting shed antlers Montana public lands for the past 50 years. This Three Forks native’s phenomenal shed antler collection comprises some 14,500 sheds displayed from floor to ceiling—inside a 30 x 64-foot building he constructed specifically for its display. And, yes, he personally found every one.

dream house! i have plan:

le plan- befriend this man. get on this mans will. wait for him to die and take all the antlers.

Except a lot of these aren’t “sheds” they’re attached to the skullplate of the deer, there are even a few actual skulls in there I can see. I mean yeah it’s possible to find them naturally dead (or snag them from roadkill dumping sites) but they aren’t “shed antlers.” You don’t shed your skull the way you shed hair, unless you think a buck grows a new head every season.

Deer God!

Above: replicas of the mastadons from La Brea Tar Pits as foam models covered in chocolate. 

Baker Sara Heslington of Heslington Cakes in Corona Del Mar created this, alongside other food-based Los Angeles landmarks, for a gala for Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA.

About 11,000 years ago, the area that is now La Brea in Los Angeles housed tar pits, in which animals such as mammoths would get trapped. They would die from starvation, exhaustion, or predation, and sink into the tar. Often carnivorous animals would hear their cries and try to attack the trapped animal, only to find themselves trapped as well. 

Reblogged from paleobiology  762 notes
cmkosemenillustrated:

A never-seen-before illustration from All Yesterdays, my book with John Conway and Darren Naish. Yes, these are “shrink-wrap” reconstructions of birds again. A pelican and a shoebill stork as interpreted by clueless future palaeontologists.
www.cmkosemen.com

Someone pointed out that these future paleontologists would be able to determine that these animals had feathers because they would be able to compare them to other birds. Yes, however it is potentially possible that in the future there would be no birds to which to compare them, and all avians would be reconstructed as weird, creepy bald monsters.

cmkosemenillustrated:

A never-seen-before illustration from All Yesterdays, my book with John Conway and Darren Naish. Yes, these are “shrink-wrap” reconstructions of birds again. A pelican and a shoebill stork as interpreted by clueless future palaeontologists.

www.cmkosemen.com

Someone pointed out that these future paleontologists would be able to determine that these animals had feathers because they would be able to compare them to other birds. Yes, however it is potentially possible that in the future there would be no birds to which to compare them, and all avians would be reconstructed as weird, creepy bald monsters.

Reblogged from alphynix  287 notes
alphynix:

A 120 million-year-old example of polycephaly, found in China in 2006. This is a bizarrely two-headed fossil of a newborn Hyphalosaurus, a member of a group of extinct semi-aquatic reptiles known as choristoderes.
Hyphalosaurus lived in freshwater lakes, and their remains are so numerous that their entire lifespan is represented from embryos to fully grown adults. Females have even been found with developed embryos still inside their bodies, showing that they gave birth to live young.

Dicephaly + fossils = <33

alphynix:

A 120 million-year-old example of polycephaly, found in China in 2006. This is a bizarrely two-headed fossil of a newborn Hyphalosaurus, a member of a group of extinct semi-aquatic reptiles known as choristoderes.

Hyphalosaurus lived in freshwater lakes, and their remains are so numerous that their entire lifespan is represented from embryos to fully grown adults. Females have even been found with developed embryos still inside their bodies, showing that they gave birth to live young.

Dicephaly + fossils = <33